Tis’ The Season for Holiday Travel—What Impact May it have on your Fertility?

Tis’ The Season for Holiday Travel—What Impact May it have on your Fertility?

Whether you are connecting with family, visiting home, or taking a well-deserved vacation, you may be wondering if air travel will affect your fertility. There are many physiological changes associated with travel that have the potential to disrupt internal processes, such as an altered sleep cycle, stress, shift in time zone, and change in diet. Researching how these factors relate to fertility can be tedious and confusing, especially given the lack of open discourse surrounding women’s reproductive health. Below are scientific answers to some questions women may have regarding fertility and plane travel.

Is Traveling for IVF Worth It? An Overview of Benefits and Risks

Is Traveling for IVF Worth It? An Overview of Benefits and Risks

As costs of medical procedures are on the rise, many Americans are looking abroad for more affordable care. In fact, a study conducted with collaboration between NYU, the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and other global institutions, shows that US Citizens make up approximately 10% of medical tourists worldwide, with the numbers exponentially increasing every year. Though the most common procedures people travel for are cardiac-related or orthopedic surgeries, there is a growing population of women that opt to undergo IVF abroad. In this weeks blog we explore the benefits and risk of traveling for IVF.

How to Actually Lose Weight

How to Actually Lose Weight

Whether trying to lose 5 pounds or 100, losing weight can be a special challenge -- especially during this time of year. Even though the ‘95% of diets fail’ statistic is a myth (Fritsch 1999), diets don’t work for many who try them. Counting calories, putting food on scales, or keeping a food journal can be even more stressful when trying to conceive.

How likely is pregnancy in 20s? 30s? 40s?

How likely is pregnancy in 20s? 30s? 40s?

It may be believed that only the parts of the United States where sex education that involves scare tactics to promote abstinence until marriage results in adults with a poor understanding of contraception and reproduction, but actually, it’s a global problem. Women all over the world, have poor understanding of their fertility. Amy Klein, writer of the fertility diary for the New York Times wrote, “A global study published for World Fertility Awareness Month in 2006 surveyed 17,500 people (most of childbearing age) from 10 countries in Europe, Africa, the Middle East and South America, revealing very poor knowledge about fertility and the biology of reproduction.”

Prenatal Vitamins 101: How They Work and How to Choose the Right One

Prenatal Vitamins 101: How They Work and How to Choose the Right One

Prenatal vitamins are recommended to women in order to assure healthy embryonic development. However, the vast selection of brands and endless varieties of pills can make it hard to pick the best one. Adding to the ambiguity is that the effectiveness of certain vitamins is tied to lifestyle factors such as weight, exercise, and quality of nutrition. There are some things to keep in mind as you decide which vitamins you need. This article will cover the scientific reasoning for why prenatal vitamins are essential, and how to optimize the effects of taking them by choosing the right ones.

Signs of Fertility: What your body can tell you about your fertility

Signs of Fertility: What your body can tell you about your fertility

In biology class you may have learned about your reproductive organs and hormones, but it’s unlikely that you learned about how your cervical fluid, temperature, urine and saliva all can be used to indicate your fertility. Women can learn about their unique cycles using their own physiological signs to predict and determine ovulation.

PCOS and Infertility: Signs, Symptoms, and Trying to Conceive

PCOS and Infertility: Signs, Symptoms, and Trying to Conceive

Caroline is 20 years old, a normal weight, and has mild acne. She experiences mood disruption on occasion and has light periods. Her body shows no signs of excess hair growth. Her friend Kayla is 35 years old, is slightly overweight, and experiences moderate acne. She has some excess hair on her face, chest, and abdomen. Her periods are heavy, irregular, and usually accompanied by painful cramps. Though the two women have vastly differing symptoms, they both share a diagnosis of Polycystic ovary syndrome, also known as PCOS. Here we explore current information on signs, symptoms and trying to conceive.

Common Questions About Conceiving After the Birth Control Pill

 Common Questions About Conceiving After the Birth Control Pill

Is it a myth or fact that oral contraceptives (OC) affect fertility? Truth be told, since hormonal birth control continues to evolve, we are still learning about how fertility is impacted. While fertility was found to be delayed in a study performed in 1997, more recent studies show that fertility is not impacted.

A significant number of women in the US use OCs. Recent data from the CDC shows that 99.3% of women aged 15-44 have tried a type of birth control, with 79.3% having tried oral contraceptives (OC). Since a high percentage of women use, or have tried the pill, it is understandable many question any possible side effects that may affect fertility.

The Fertility 'Cliff'- When is it Too late to Conceive?

The Fertility 'Cliff'- When is it Too late to Conceive?

By the time a woman reaches the age of 35, her chances of getting pregnant in a single cycle drop even more significantly. After the age of 40, women have less than a 5% change of getting pregnant in a cycle. Still, we all personally know women and see celebrities that get pregnant later in life. Though getting pregnant later in life isn’t the norm for everyone, you may wonder how far the fertility cliff actually drops.

Ovulation Calculators, What to Know When Trying to Get Pregnant

 Ovulation Calculators, What to Know When Trying to Get Pregnant

Timing the fertile window is one of the most important steps to take to get pregnant. Outside of a woman’s fertile window, there is nearly a 0% chance of getting pregnant. There are several methods out there to find this elusive window, including ovulation calculators. How often can a calculator reliability determine when a woman is fertile?

Test your Fertility Expertise

Test your Fertility Expertise

How much do you really know about fertility? Perhaps you are nearly an expert from all the research you've done online about how to get pregnant faster, or perhaps you are a healthcare professional who advices women on best practices when it comes to trying to get pregnant. Regardless of who you are, it's fun to test our knowledge base on questions about our incredible bodies and the miracle of conception.  Go ahead, give it a go. 

How to know when you are fertile

How to know when you are fertile

Outside of the ‘fertile window’, a woman has a 0% chance of conception. Medical opinion tells us that our fertile window is about 6 days long.  More specifically, the ideal time for conception is 1-2 days prior to ovulation.  That’s because a woman’s egg typically lives for 12-24 hours and sperm typically live 1-3 days inside a woman’s body. Therefore, the highest pregnancy rates seem to be when there is sperm waiting for the egg during this ‘fertile window’ time frame. In this post we explore the current methods to detect the elusive fertile window. 

New Year Resolutions That May Help With Getting Pregnant Faster

New Year Resolutions That May Help With Getting Pregnant Faster

Any day of the year can be a new day to start a goal. New Years Day is simply another day on the calendar, but there is something special about having a designated day where millions of people around the world start (or revisit) goals. If you are thinking about or currently trying to get pregnant, there are lifestyle habits that can make a significant difference on your fertility, as well as the health of your pregnancy. Here we address 3 modifiable lifestyle factors that can help you get pregnant faster and are fantastic New Year Resolutions (or any day goals) for a healthier version of yourself. 

Lifestyle Factors to Help Regulate your Menstrual Cycle

Lifestyle Factors to Help Regulate your Menstrual Cycle

After years of struggling to figure out what was wrong with her body, Dr. Kyle Willets ditched birth control and completely changed her diet. By eliminating  foods such as sugar, Dr. Willets healed her body from PCOS and no longer needed to be on medication to regulate her cycles. As hard as it may be to believe, it’s been scientifically shown that by making changes, such as adding 30 minutes of walking a day, to losing 10 pounds, hormonal imbalances can be fixed and therefore, lead to regular cycles in some women. Here we address 5 common causes of irregular cycles in which lifestyle changes may help to regulate your period.

Do Irregular Periods Cause Infertility?

Do Irregular Periods Cause Infertility?

There are several things that have to happen to get pregnant. One, a woman needs to ovulate; two, a man needs to have viable sperm; and three, the two have to get together. If you have very irregular periods, it’s hard to know when you are ovulating or even if you are ovulating.   Having irregular cycles may make it more difficult for a woman to become pregnant than it is for a woman with regular cycles. Dr. Don Aptekar, MD FACOG, explains, “a woman that has regular periods may ovulate 12 times in a year, while a woman with irregular periods may ovulate 6 times a year. Since she has fewer chances per year, it may take her longer to get pregnant.”

What Causes Secondary Infertility

What Causes Secondary Infertility

According to the National Center for Health Statistics more than 3 million women of childbearing age in the U.S. who have one biological child have difficulty getting pregnant or carrying another to term (source). If you and your partner have successfully had a child or children without any previous problems, you may be wondering what could be causing it to be so difficult this time around. Here is a review of what can be behind secondary infertility and when you should seek help.

How STDs can Harm Fertility (and what to do about it)

How STDs can Harm Fertility (and what to do about it)

As if getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD) isn't bad enough, if you are trying to get pregnant, STDs can harm your fertility as well as your future baby. If people think their grandmothers (or worse their dads) giving sex advice is embarrassing enough, talking about STDs is a whole new level all together and likely to be incredibly uncomfortable. Since 1 in 4 Americans will develop an STD sometime during their lifetime,  this is a topic that needs to be addressed (source). Whether you have been diagnosed with an STD in the past or not, this is a conversation to have with your doctor at your preconception visit or annual physical. If you or your partner has a history of multiple sexual partners, it’s especially important for the both of you to get screened. Many STDs are asymptomatic (have no signs or symptoms) and since routine gynecological exams do not often test for all STDs, you could have one without even knowing it (source). For this blog post we review the 7 STDs that can harm fertility and even cause infertility if left untreated and what can be done to protect you and your future baby. 

Do the Changes in the Menstrual Cycle Due to Age Indicate Changes in Fertility?

Do the Changes in the Menstrual Cycle Due to Age Indicate Changes in Fertility?

It’s no secret that fertility declines with age. The exact age a woman’s fertility declines is unique for each individual. Some women will struggle to conceive in their early 30s due to age-related egg quality and others will find themselves still fertile at 46 years of age. Nevertheless, your body may give you some subtle clues that your fertility is changing. Here we examine how a woman’s cycle can change with age and how these changes impact fertility.